S. Bilal Kadiri

Assistant Professor - King Khalid University

Background:
Bilal Kadiri was recently appointed as an Assistant Professor of English at King Khalid University. Kadiri completed his PhD at Lancaster University in 2017 under the supervision of Professor Paul Baker, with his thesis investigating 'the construction of identities in the BBC sitcom Citizen Khan'. He had previously held a lecturing post at Taibah University between 2009 and 2014, where he was responsible for managing different ESP programs.

However, Kadiri's major accomplishments have come outside of academia. He has an extensive Business background, holding a BSc in Business and Management from Brunel University, as well as being a Prince2 certified Project Manager. Kadiri has previously held the position of Head of Business and Professional Development at Aleaf Windows, where he increased monthly revenues by £80,000 in his second month in the role. Kadiri's accomplishments at Aleaf culminated in him being invited to the House of Lords, for an event which hosted prominent members of the Muslim business community. His most recent position is Head of Business Development at HME Dubai Investments, where he is aiming to secure a minimum of £500,000 worth of investments within the first half of 2018.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Kadiri, S. B. (2017). ‘A Corpus-based analysis of the Construction of Identities in the BBC Sitcom Citizen Khan.’ Unpublished Doctoral Thesis, Lancaster University, UK.

Kadiri is currently preparing three papers that will be submitted to international journals in 2018. The papers are related to the following three areas of research:
- Media representations of Islam/Muslims
- Use of semantic annotation in corpus studies
- Intersectionality

Paul Baker

Professor - Lancaster University

Background:
Paul Baker is Professor of English Language at Lancaster University. His research interests include corpus linguistics, language and identities and (critical) discourse analysis. Baker is also a co-investigator at CASS and has been heavily involved in a number of CASS Projects.

Baker is a prolific author and has authored 16 books, as well as numerous book chapters and journal articles, with the titles mentioned below only providing a brief glimpse into his immense contribution within the field of corpus linguistics.

Notable Publications:
Baker, P., Hardie, A. & McEnery, A. (2006) A Glossary of Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
Baker, P. (2006) Using Corpora in Discourse Analysis. London: Continuum
Baker, P. Gabrielatos, C. and McEnery. T. (2013) Discourse Analysis and Media Attitudes: The Representation of Islam in the British Press. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Baker, P. (2017) American and British English. Divided by a Common Language? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Baker, P. and Balirano, G. (eds) (2017) Queering Masculinities in Language and Culture. London: Palgrave

Costas Gabrielatos

Senior Lecturer - Edge Hill University

Background:
Costas Gabrielatos is a senior lecturer in English Language at Edge Hill University and has been working in corpus linguistics since 2001. Gabrielatos joined Edge Hill University in September 2012, having previously worked as an associate lecturer and researcher at Lancaster University and Liverpool University.

Gabrielatos’s general research interests are in the development of corpus approaches to issues in theoretical and applied linguistics. More specifically, his work combines the following areas:
– Corpus Linguistics: compilation of topic-specific corpora, annotation techniques, metrics.
– Lexicogrammar: conditionals, modality, tense-aspect, construction grammar, lexical grammar.
– Corpora in language education: pedagogical lexicogrammar, analysis of learner language.
– Corpus approaches to (critical) discourse studies.

Notable Publications:
Gabrielatos, C. (2005). Corpora and Language Teaching: Just a Fling or Wedding Bells?. TESL-EJ, 8(4), n4.
Gabrielatos, C., McEnery, T., Diggle, P. & Baker, P. (2012). The peaks and troughs of corpus-based contextual analysis. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 37(2), 151-175.
Baker, P., Gabrielatos, C., & McEnery, T. (2013). Discourse analysis and media attitudes: The representation of Islam in the British press. Cambridge University Press.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Gabrielatos, C. (2018). Keyness Analysis: nature, metrics and techniques. In Taylor, C. & Marchi, A. (eds) Corpus Approaches To Discourse: A critical review. Oxford: Routledge.
Gabrielatos, C. (2018) The lexicogrammar of BE interested: description and pedagogy. In Hoffmann, S., Sand, A. & Arndt-Lappe, S. (eds.) Recent Studies on Corpora and Lexis. Language and Computers – Studies in Digital Linguistics. Amsterdam: Brill.
Torgersen, E., Gabrielatos, C. & Hoffmann, S. (2018) Corpus-based analysis of the pragmatic marker you get me. In Friginal, E. (ed.) Studies in Corpus-Based Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Routledge.

Tony McEnery

Distinguished Professor - Lancaster University

Background:
Tony McEnery is the Interim CEO and Director of Research at the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), as well as being a Distinguished Professor of English Language and Linguistics at Lancaster University. McEnery was previously Director of the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), as well as being the Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Lancaster University, from 2008-2014.

McEnery’s achievements and contributions to research in the social sciences cannot be fully illuminated in the confines of this profiles. He has received research funding to date of £7,296,714 and has been principal-investigator for a number of research projects. Despite his commitments at ESRC, McEnery continues to supervise postgraduate students at both Masters and PhD levels, as well as teach on a summer school in corpus linguistics at Lancaster University.

Notable Publications:
McEnery, A. M., & Wilson, A. (2001). Corpus linguistics: an introduction. Edinburgh University Press
Baker, P., Hardie, A. & McEnery, A. (2006) A Glossary of Corpus Linguistics. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
McEnery, T., & Hardie, A. (2011). Corpus linguistics: Method, theory and practice. Cambridge University Press.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Love, R., Dembry, C., Hardie, A., Brezina, V., & McEnery, T. (2017). The Spoken BNC2014: Designing and building a spoken corpus of everyday conversations. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 22(3)
McEnery, A., & Baker, H. (2017). Corpus Linguistics and 17th-century Prostitution: Computational Linguistics and History. Bloomsbury Academic.
Baker, H., McEnery, T., & Hardie, A. (2017). A corpus based investigation into English representations of Turks and Ottomans in the early modern period. Lexical Priming: Applications and advances, 79, 41.

Paul Rayson

Reader - Lancaster University

Background:
Paul Rayson is director of the UCREL research centre and a Reader in the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University. He is also a co-investigator of the five-year ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) which is designed to bring the corpus approach to bear on a range of social sciences. Rayson is arguably best known for the development of the Wmatrix online software tool, which he initially developed during his doctoral studies at Lancaster University.

The long term focus of Rayson’s work is the application of semantic-based NLP in extreme circumstances where language is noisy e.g. in historical, learner, speech, email, txt and other CMC varieties. His applied research is in the areas of online child protection, cyber security, learner dictionaries, and text mining of historical corpora and annual financial reports.

Notable Publications:
Wilson, A., Rayson, P., & McEnery, A. M. (2002). A rainbow of corpora: Corpus linguistics and the languages of the world. Lincom-Europa.
Rayson, P. (2008). From key words to key semantic domains. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. 13:4 pp. 519-549.
Leech, G., & Rayson, P. (2014). Word frequencies in written and spoken English: Based on the British National Corpus. Routledge.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Gregory, I. N., Donaldson, C. E., Hardie, A. & Rayson, P. E. (Expected 2018) The shape of data in digital humanities: modeling texts and text-based resources. In Flanders, J. & Jannidis, F. (eds.). Routledge, (Digital Research in the Arts and Humanities)
Semino, E., Demjén, Z., Demmen, J., Koller, V., Payne, S., Hardie, A., & Rayson, P. (2017). The online use of Violence and Journey metaphors by patients with cancer, as compared with health professionals: a mixed methods study. BMJ supportive & palliative care, 7(1), 60-66.
Semino, E., Demjén, Z., Hardie, A., Payne, S., & Rayson, P. (2017). Metaphor, Cancer and the End of Life: A Corpus-based Study. Routledge.

Jonathan Culpeper

Professor - Lancaster University

Background:
Jonathan Culpeper is Professor of English Language and Linguistics in the Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University, UK. Spanning pragmatics, stylistics and the history of English, his major publications include Language and Characterisation in Plays and Other Texts (2001, Longman), Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing (2010, CUP; co-authored with Merja Kytö), Impoliteness: Using Language to Cause Offence (2011, CUP), Pragmatics and the English Language (2014, Palgrave; with Michael Haugh), and (the monumental!) English Language: Description, Variation and Context (2018, Palgrave; lead editor).

Culpeper was awarded a prestigious three-year ESRC UK Fellowship (2006-9) to study linguistic impoliteness, and for five years was co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Pragmatics (2009-14). He is currently leading the £1 million AHRC-funded Encyclopaedia of Shakespeare's Language project, which will provide evidence-based and contextualised accounts of Shakespeare's language.

Notable Publications:
Culpeper, Jonathan (2002) Computers, language and characterisation: An Analysis of six characters in Romeo and Juliet. In: Ulla Melander-Marttala, Carin Ostman and Merja Kytö (eds.), Conversation in Life and in Literature: Papers from the ASLA Symposium, Association Suedoise de Linguistique Appliquee (ASLA), 15. Universitetstryckeriet: Uppsala, pp.11-30. (Also available at: http://www.lexically.net/wordsmith/corpus_linguistics_links/papers_using_wordsmith.htm)
Culpeper, Jonathan (2009) Keyness: Words, parts-of-speech and semantic categories in the character-talk of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 14(1): 29-59.
Culpeper, Jonathan and Merja Kytö (2010) Speech in Writing: Explorations in Early Modern English Dialogues. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Hardaker, C., & Culpeper, J. V. (2016). Pragmatics and corpus linguistics. In Baker, P., & Egbert, J. (Eds.). (2016). Triangulating Methodological Approaches in Corpus Linguistic Research(Vol. 17). Routledge.
(Forthcoming) Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's Language, to be published by Bloomsbury

Paul Thompson

Senior Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Background:
Paul Thompson is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Birmingham and Deputy Director at the Centre for Corpus Research. His research interests are in academic and other specialised discourses, in tracking writing development through corpus investigation, in uses of educational technologies in language learning, and in the exploitation of corpus resources and methodologies in learning about language.

Thompson was Principal Investigator on an ESRC project (ES/K007300/1) on 'Investigating interdisciplinary research discourse: the case of Global Environmental Change', August 2013 to November 2015.With Hilary Nesi and others, he worked on the development of the British Academic Written and Spoken corpora (BAWE and BASE, both accessible through Sketch Engine Open, https://the.sketchengine.co.uk/open/).

Notable Publications:
Thompson, P., & Sealey, A. (2007). Through children’s eyes?: Corpus evidence of the features of children’s literature. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 12(1), 1-23.
Thompson, P., Diaz-Negrillo, A.(2013) Learner corpora: Looking towards the future. In A. Díaz-Negrillo, N. Ballier and P. Thompson (eds) Automatic Treatment and Analysis of Learner Corpus Data Amsterdam: John Benjamins, pp 9-30.
Benitez-Castro, M. A., & Thompson, P. (2015). Shell-nounhood in academic discourse: A critical state-of-the-art review. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 20(3), 378-404.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Thompson, P., Hunston, S., Murakami, A., & Vajn, D. (2017). Multi-Dimensional Analysis, text constellations, and interdisciplinary discourse. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 22(2), 153-186.
Murakami, A., Thompson, P., Hunston, S., & Vajn, D. (2017). ‘What is this corpus about?’: using topic modelling to explore a specialised corpus. Corpora, 12(2), 243-277.
(Forthcoming) Working on a book on interdisciplinary research discourses with Susan Hunston.

Amanda Potts

Lecturer - Cardiff University

Background:
Amanda Potts is a Lecturer in Public and Professional Discourse. Her specialism is in corpus-based critical discourse analysis of texts and topics in public and professional communication, most recently: media discourse, medical communication, and language of the law. Potts’ work usually takes a mixed methodological approach, exploring some combination of the following topics: semantics; metaphor analysis; analysis of culture; sociolinguistics; representations of identity; gender/sexuality; investigation of discriminatory discourses; discourse communities in social media.

In 2017, Potts became a founding co-editor of the Journal of Corpora and Discourse Studies, published by Cardiff University Press. JCaDS is a twice-yearly, peer-reviewed, online, open-access journal publishing corpus-assisted research into discourse, defined as language in use as a vehicle of communication. JCaDS is pluridisciplinary and they welcome studies from all areas of the humanities and social sciences that incorporate corpus techniques in investigating how spoken and written language is used and how meanings are created and explored. She is also a member of the Centre for Language and Communication Research, the Cardiff Corpus Network, and CaLL: Cardiff Language and Law.

Notable Publications:
Potts, A. and Baker, P. 2012. Does semantic tagging identify cultural change in British and American English?. International journal of corpus linguistics 17(3), pp. 295-324.
Baker, P. and Potts, A. 2013. ?Why do white people have thin lips?? Google and the perpetuation of stereotypes via auto-complete search forms. Critical Discourse Studies 10(2), pp. 187-204.
Potts, A., Bednarek, M. and Caple, H. 2015. How can computer-based methods help researchers to investigate news values in large datasets? A corpus linguistic study of the construction of newsworthiness in the reporting on Hurricane Katrina. Discourse & Communication 9(2), pp. 149-172.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Potts, A. and Weare, S. 2017. Mother, Monster, Mrs, I: A critical evaluation of gendered naming strategies in English sentencing remarks of women who kill. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law
Potts, A. and Semino, E. 2017. Healthcare professionals' online use of violence metaphors for care at the end of life in the US: a corpus-based comparison with the UK. Corpora 12(1), pp. 55-84.

Bodo Winter

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Background:
Bodo Winter is a lecturer in cognitive linguistics at the University of Birmingham. He received his PhD in Cognitive & Information Sciences from the University of California, Merced and his MA in General Linguistics from the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. His research focuses on metaphor, iconicity, gesture and sensory language.

His corpus work involves multimodal corpus analyses (e.g., metaphorical gestures in the TV News Archive) as well as quantitative corpus analyses that incorporate the use of semantic ratings, such as when using emotional valence ratings to quantify semantic prosody. Bodo Winter is committed to reproducible research practices (including open data and open scripts) and has also published several resources for statistical methodology, including a tutorial on linear mixed effects models.

Notable Publications:
Winter, B., Perlman, M., & Matlock, T. (2014). Using space to talk and gesture about numbers: Evidence from the TV News Archive. Gesture, 13, 377-408.
Winter, B. (2016). Taste and smell words form an affectively loaded part of the English lexicon. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience, 31(8), 975-988.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Winter, B. (under review). Quantifying semantic prosody: The case of perceptual language. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory.

Eric Atwell

Associate Professor - Leeds University

Background:
Atwell started his academic career as a Research Fellow at UCREL, Lancaster University, developing the Tagged LOB Corpus of British English. Then he moved to Leeds University to be a Lecturer in Computing before taking time out to be National Coordinator of the JISC Knowledge Based Systems Initiative, and follow-on research exploitation. Atwell then returned to School of Computing, where he is an Associate Professor in the Artificial Intelligence group.

Atwell’s research speciality is corpus linguistics and text analytics: Machine Learning and Data Mining analysis of a CORPUS of text - in English, Arabic, or other languages - to analyse the text and detect "interesting" and "useful" features or patterns. For example: Detecting terrorist activities, by analysis of documents from terrorist suspects, to highlight suspicious parts of the text. Analysis and text-mining of the Quran, to find links and patterns in the Quran verses and chapters whcih are of interest to Islamic and Religious Studies scholars. Detecting cause of death from verbal autopsy text documents describing the circumstances of the death.

Notable Publications:
Leech, G., Garside, R., & Atwell, E. S. (1983). The automatic grammatical tagging of the LOB corpus. ICAME Journal: International Computer Archive of Modern and Medieval English Journal, 7, 13-33.
Al-Sulaiti, L., & Atwell, E. S. (2006). The design of a corpus of contemporary Arabic. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 11(2), 135-171.
Shawar, B. A., & Atwell, E. (2007). Chatbots: are they really useful?. In LDV Forum (Vol. 22, No. 1, pp. 29-49).

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Alosaimy A; Atwell E (2018) Tagging Classical Arabic Text using Available Morphological Analysers and Part of Speech Taggers. Journal for Language Technology and Computational Linguistics,
Atwell E (2018) Using the Web to model Modern and Quranic Arabic. In: McEnery T; Hardie A; Younis N eds. Arabic Corpus Linguistics., Edinburgh University Press, .
Atwell E (2018) Classical and Modern Arabic Corpora: genre and language change. In: Whitt RJ ed. Diachronic corpora, genre, and language change., John Benjamins, .

Ronald Carter

Emeritus Professor - The University of Nottingham

Background:
Ronald Carter is an Emeritus Professor of Modern English Language at the University of Nottingham. He has been at Nottingham University since 1979 and has previously held the positions of Director of the Centre for English Language Education and Head of the School of English. He was also chair of BAAL (British Association for Applied Linguistics) from 2003-2006 and was recently elected a fellow of the British Academy for Social Sciences.Carter’s enormous contribution to the field of English Language Teaching resulted in him being elected a life member of NATE (National Association for the Teaching of English) in 2007. He is also on the editorial boards of numerous international academic and professional journal and has lectured in over 40 countries world-wide.

Professor Carter's main research interests are in the broad field of applied linguistics. This includes work on corpus and computational linguistics, discourse-based grammar, English vocabulary and the interface between language and literature. In terms of literature and language, his main interest is in the relationship between language and creativity, with particular reference to spoken discourse and he has published widely on this topic, including Language and Creativity: The art of common talk (Routledge, 2004/ 2nd ed 2015) --- a book which, together with Vocabulary (third ed, 2012), has been designated a Routledge Linguistics Classic . He has recently worked on a number of ESRC- and EPSRC-funded e-social science projects researching the multi-modal relationship between language and gesture in context. A book on this topic (with Prof Svenja Adolphs) Spoken Corpus Linguistics: From monomodal to multimodal (Routledge: New York) was published in 2013. He also has current research interests in the discourses of professional and media communication and the relationship between language and social networking media using corpus-linguistic analytical tools.

Notable Publications:
CARTER, R.A., ed., 2004. John Sinclair, Trust the Text: Lexis, Corpus and Discourse Routledge.
O'KEEFFE, A., MCCARTHY, M.J. and CARTER, R.A., 2007. From Corpus to Classroom: Language use and language teaching. CUP.
Carter, R., & McCarthy, M. J. (2006). Cambridge grammar of English: A comprehensive guide to spoken and written grammar and usage. CUP.
Adolphs, S., & Carter, R. (2013). Spoken corpus linguistics: From monomodal to multimodal (Vol. 15). Routledge.
CARTER, R.A., 2015. Language and Creativity: The art of common talk London 2nd Ed. Routledge (Linguistics Classics edition).
CARTER, R.A., MCCARTHY, M.J., MARK, G. and O'KEEFFE, A., 2016. English grammar today: an A-Z of spoken and written grammar (open access via Cambridge Dictionaries on-line, Cambridge University Press) 2nd Ed. Cambridge University Press.

Matteo Fuoli

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Background:
Matteo Fuoli is a lecturer at the University of Birmingham in corpus-based discourse analysis. He joined the Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics in Birmingham as a Lecturer in April 2017. Prior to this, Fuoli received his PhD in English Language and Linguistics from Lund University, in Sweden. His thesis focused on organizational trust from a discourse analytical and experimental perspective. During Fuoli’s years as a PhD candidate, he taught on a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses at Lund University, including Corpus Linguistics, Discourse Analysis, and Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics.

Fuoli is primarily interested in exploring how business organizations use discourse to negotiate public trust and social legitimacy. Another major focus of his research is the language of evaluation, i.e. how speakers and writers express emotions, attitudes, and opinions in discourse. Fuoli’s research interests also include corpus methodology, experimental approaches to (critical) discourse analysis, and multimodal metaphor. His research combines multiple methodological perspectives, including qualitative discourse analysis, corpus-based methods, and experimentation.

Notable Publications:
Fuoli, M. (2012). Assessing social responsibility: A quantitative analysis of Appraisal in BP’s and IKEA’s social reports. Discourse & Communication, 6(1), 55-81.
Fuoli, M., & Hommerberg, C. (2015). Optimising transparency, reliability and replicability: annotation principles and inter-coder agreement in the quantification of evaluative expressions. Corpora, 10(3), 315-349.
Põldvere, N., Fuoli, M., & Paradis, C. (2016). A study of dialogic expansion and contraction in spoken discourse using corpus and experimental techniques. Corpora, 11(2), 191-225.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Fuoli, M. (2017). Building a trustworthy corporate identity: A corpus-based analysis of stance in annual and corporate social responsibility reports. Applied Linguistics, amw058.

John Flowerdew

(Professor) Visiting Chair - Lancaster University

Background:
John Flowerdew is a professor of Applied Linguistics, focusing on discourse studies (including critical discourse analysis, political discourse analysis, academic discourse analysis, and corpus-based approaches) and language education. He has authored or edited 16 books and special editions of journals and has published over 100 book chapters and internationally refereed journal articles. He serves on the editorial boards of a range of international journals and book series.

In 2016, Flowerdew retired from City University of Hong after 26 years of service, but remains a visiting chair at the University of Lancaster and is now based in Royal Tunbridge Wells in the UK. He remains active in research and publication and is regularly invited to speak at international conferences.

Notable Publications:
Flowerdew, L. (1998). Corpus linguistic techniques applied to textlinguistics. System, 26(4), 541-552.
Flowerdew, L. (2005). An integration of corpus-based and genre-based approaches to text analysis in EAP/ESP: countering criticisms against corpus-based methodologies. English for specific purposes, 24(3), 321-332.
Flowerdew, J., & Mahlberg, M. (Eds.). (2009). Lexical cohesion and corpus linguistics (Vol. 17). John Benjamins Publishing.
Flowerdew, J., & Forest, R. W. (2015). Signalling Nouns in Academic English: A Corpus-based Discourse Approach. Cambridge University Press.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Flowerdew, J. (2017). Corpus-based approaches to language description for specialized academic writing. Language Teaching, 50(1), 90-106.

Bas Aarts

Professor - University College London

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Jens Zinn

Researcher - Lancaster University

Background:
Jens Zinn is an Associate Professor in Sociology at the University of Melbourne and recently won an Individual Fellowship with the EU (H2020-MSCA-IF) to conduct a two year project "Understanding the discourse-semantic shift towards risk in the UK and Germany" at the ESRC centre Corpus Approaches to Social Science at Lancaster University.

Zinn studied Sociology, Social Psychology and Political Science at the University of Saarland and the University of Bielefeld (Germany). He worked at the Collaborative Research Center Status Passages and Risks in the Life Course in Bremen (1995-99), the Collaborative Research Centre Reflexive Modernization in Munich (1999-02) and in the ESRC priority network Social Contexts and Responses to Risk at the University of Kent (2003-08). He joined the University of Melbourne in January 2009 and has since founded a number of international research networks on the Sociology of Risk and Uncertainty (SoRU) within the European Sociological Association (2005) and the International Sociological Association (2006). In 2015 he was awarded the prestigious Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel award by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

Notable Publications:
Zinn, J.O. 2010: Risk as Discourse: Interdisciplinary Perspectives. CADAAD journal 4(2), 106-24. [available at: http://cadaad.net/files/journal/CADAAD2010_Zinn.pdf]
Zinn, J. O. and McDonald, D. 2016: Changing Discourses of Risk and Health Risk: A Corpus Analysis of the Usage of Risk Language in the New York Times. In: Chamberlain, M. (ed.): Medicine, Risk, Discourse and Power, London, New York: Routledge, 207-240.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Zinn, J. O., & McDonald, D. (2018). Risk in The New York Times (1987–2014): A corpus-based exploration of sociological theories. Springer.

Rachelle Vessey

Lecturer - Birkbeck University of London

Background:
Rachelle Vessey is a Lecturer of Applied Linguistics at Birkbeck, University of London. She uses corpus linguistics and discourse analysis to analyse news and social media in order to demonstrate how “common sense” beliefs about language are related to broader social issues and hierarchies within minority groups, national groups, and a globalised world. Beliefs about language tend to underpin the way people communicate and the kinds of assumptions that are made about different languages and speakers.

Vessey is especially interested in the role of the former colonial languages English and French and their role in countries such as Canada. She published on these areas in various journals and in her book, which was published in 2016.

Notable Publications:
Vessey R. (2013) Challenges in Cross-Linguistic Corpus-Assisted Discourse Studies. Corpora. 8(1), 1-26.
Vessey R.(2015) Corpus Approaches to language ideology. Applied Linguistics, 38 (3), 277–296.
Vessey, R. (2016) Language and Canadian media: Representations, ideologies, policies. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Glenn Hadikin

Senior Lecturer - University of Portsmouth

Background:
Glenn Hadikin is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Portsmouth and has been teaching English language and linguistics for 18 years including 7 in South Korea. Before moving to Portsmouth he was teaching at the University of Liverpool and Liverpool Hope University.

Hadikin is interested in corpus linguistics, formulaic language and new World Englishes especially Asian Englishes. His current research projects are about the language of citizen science, language and the well-being of students, and the language of REF documents.

Notable Publications:
Hadikin, G. (2011). Corpus, Concordance, Koreans: a comparison of the spoken English of two Korean communities(Doctoral dissertation, University of Liverpool).
Hadikin, G. (2014). A, an and the environments in Spoken Korean English. Corpora, 9(1), 1-28.
Hadikin, G. (2014). Korean English: A corpus-driven study of a new English (Vol. 62). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Wyatt, M., & Hadikin, G. (2015). ‘They parked two buses’: a corpus study of a football expression. English Today, 31(4), 34-41.

Doug Arnold

Visiting Fellow - University of Essex

Background:
Doug Arnold is currently a Visiting Fellow at the Department of Language and Linguistics at the University of Essex. He was educated at Cambridge (English Literature), and at the University of Essex (MA and PhD in Theoretical Linguistics), where he was also a Lecturer/Senior Lecturer between 1981 and October 2017. Prior to this he had spent two years teaching English in Japan, and a year as a lecturer in Computational Linguistics at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology.

Arnold has also held visiting positions at the University of Paris Diderot (Paris 7) and The University of Tokyo. His main research interests are in formal and descriptive grammar, especially syntax and semantics, and "Constraint Based" approaches (LFG, HPSG). Arnold has also been the leader of a number of large computational linguistics research projects and is co-author of 'Machine Translation: An Introductory Guide' (NCC Blackwell).

Arnold has recently retired. However, a full list of his publications can be found at his university profile page.

Ian Gregory

Professor - Lancaster University

Background:
Ian Gregory is a geographer by training who, after doing an MSc in Geographical Information Systems (GIS) at the University of Edinburgh, got a one-year contract at Queen Mary, University of London working to create a GIS of some nineteenth century administrative data. This evolved into the Great Britain Historical GIS (GBHGIS), a major database that comprises the majority of statistical data from sources such as the census and vital registration data for the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It was also the subject of his PhD.

Since leaving London, he worked at the University of Portsmouth and then as the Associate Director of Centre for Data Digitisation and Analysis at the Queens University, Belfast. In September 2006 he moved to Lancaster where he works in Digital Humanities. Gregory is also a co-investigator at the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS).

Notable Publications:
Murrieta-Flores P., Baron A., Gregory I., Hardie A. and Rayson P. (2015) “Automatically analysing large texts in a GIS environment: The Registrar General's reports and cholera in the nineteenth century” Transactions in GIS, 19, pp. 296-320
Gregory I., Atkinson P., Hardie A., Joulain-Jay A., Kershaw D., Porter C., Rayson P. and Rupp C.J. (2016) “From digital resources to historical scholarship with the British Library 19th Century Newspaper Collection” Journal of Siberian Federal University: Humanities and Social Sciences, 9, pp. 994-1006

Helen Baker

Researcher

Background:
Helen Baker is a Newby Research Fellow at Lancaster University. Baker is a historian and completed her Ph.D. in Russian History at the University of Leeds in 2002. Her thesis examined popular reactions to the Khodynka disaster, a stampede which took place during the coronation celebrations of Nicholas II in 1896. Baker taught Russian and European history at the University of Bradford before working as a teaching assistant in the Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies at the University of Leeds between 2003-2007.

Notable Publications:
McEnery, A. and Baker, H. (2016), Corpus Linguistics and Seventeenth-Century Prostitution. London: Bloomsbury.
McEnery, T. and Baker, H. (2017), ‘The public representation of homosexual men in seventeenth-century England – a corpus based view’, Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics, 3(2): 197–217.
Baker, H., McEnery, T. and Hardie, A. (2017), ‘A corpus-based investigation into English representations of Turks and Ottomans in the early modern period’, in Pace-Sigge, M. and Patterson, K. Lexical Primining: Applications and Advances. John Benjamins.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Baker, H. Gregory, I., Hartmann, D. and McEnery, T. (Forthcoming) ‘Applying Geographical Information Systems to Researching Historical Corpora: Seventeenth-Century Prostitution’.

Mahmoud El-Haj

Researcher - Lancaster University

Background:
Dr. Mahmoud El-Haj is a Senior Research Associate at the School of Computing and Communications at Lancaster University. Mahmoud received his PhD in Computer Science from The University of Essex working on Arabic Multi-document Summarization. His research interests include Arabic and multilingual NLP, Machine Learning, Information Extraction, Financial Narratives Processing and Corpus and Computational Linguistics.

El-Haj is a member of the ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS) and has worked on multidisciplinary research projects at Lancaster University collaborating with big financial firms in London. He has also previously worked as a Data Mining developer and researcher at the UK Data Archive.

Notable Publications:
El-Haj, M., Kruschwitz, U., & Fox, C. (2015). Creating language resources for under-resourced languages: methodologies, and experiments with Arabic. Language Resources and Evaluation, 49(3), 549-580.
Salzedo, C., Young, S., & El-Haj, M. (2016). Does equity analyst research lack rigour and objectivity? Evidence from conference call questions and research notes. Accounting and Business Research, 1-32.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
El-Haj, M., , Rayson, P., Piao, S. and Wattam, S. (2017). "Creating and validating multilingual semantic representations for six languages: expert versus non-expert crowds". Proceedings of the 15th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics. Association for Computational Linguistics, p. 61-71 11 p. Valencia, Spain
El-Haj, M. et al. (2017) "BOOK: Corpus Linguistics: Analytical Applications on Arabic Language (In Arabic) ". King Saud University Press, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Mark McGlashan

Lecturer - Birmingham CIty University

Background:
Dr Mark McGlashan is Lecturer in English Language in the School of English at Birmingham City University. He holds several postgraduate research degrees in language and linguistics from Lancaster University. His interests predominantly centre on Corpus-based (Critical) Discourse Studies and the application of corpus methods to the analysis of a wide range of social issues including nationalism, racism, sexism, and homophobia. His PhD thesis examined representations of same-sex parent families in children’s picturebooks, a rare collection of publications he has widely written and presented on.

Previous positions include periods as Research Fellow at the WMG Cyber Security Centre, University of Warwick and Senior Research Associate at the ESRC-Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University. Both positions included the extensive collection and analysis of large specialised corpora from a range of online sources to investigate (amongst other things) instances of online rape threats, insider threats, discourses around cyber security and Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS), racism, and anti-Semitism.

Notable Publications:
McEnery, T., McGlashan, M., & Love, R. (2015) ‘Press and social media reaction to ideologically inspired murder: the case of Lee Rigby’ Discourse & Communication 9(2): 1-23
Hardaker, C. & McGlashan, M. (2016) ‘"Real men don’t hate women": Twitter rape threats and group identity’ Journal of Pragmatics 91: 80-93

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Baker, P. & McGlashan, M. (forthcoming) Critical Discourse Analysis: a comparison of discourses around Romanians in The Daily Express with its readers’ comments. In: Adolphs, S. & Knight, D. The Routledge Handbook of English Language and the Digital Humanities. London: Routledge

Laura Paterson

Lecturer - The Open University

Background:
Laura Paterson is a Lecturer at The Open University and she received her PhD from Loughborough University in 2011 having attended the University of Leeds for her MA and BA (Hons) qualifications. Paterson is a corpus linguist and discourse analyst interested in investigating how language is used to encode and normalise social structures. Her first book focused on epicene (gender-neutral) pronouns in written British English and included a new theory to account for why the formally plural pronoun ‘they’ can be processed as a singular form in the brain. Paterson’s current work primarily focuses on poverty and includes the forthcoming monograph ‘Discourses of Poverty and Place’ (co-authored with Ian Gregory, Lancaster University).

Paterson is a member of the Discourses of Marriage research group (http://discoursesofmarriage.blogspot.co.uk/) whose research has focused on same-sex marriage debates in the UK, surname choice upon marriage/civil partnership, and discourses of victimhood. She has also collaborated on multi-institution research projects, including an analysis of audience response to the Channel 4 television programme ‘Benefits Street’ (Paterson et al. 2016, 2017), media representations of the Occupy movement (Gregoriou and Paterson 2017), and the complexity of interpreting ‘Blurred Lines’ (Handforth et al. 2017).

Notable Publications:
Paterson, L.L. 2014. British Pronoun Use, Prescription, and Processing: Linguistic and Social Influences Affecting He and They. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
Paterson, L.L., D. Peplow & K. Grainger. 2017. Does money talk equal class talk? Audience responses to poverty porn in relation to money and debt. In A. Mooney & E. Sifaki (eds). The Language of Money and Debt: An Interdisciplinary Approach. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
van der Bom, I., L.L. Paterson, K. Grainger & D. Peplow. 2018. ‘It’s not the fact they claim benefits but their useless, lazy, drug taking lifestyles we despise’: Analysing audience responses to Benefits Street using live tweets. Discourse, Context & Media 21: 36-45.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Paterson, L.L. & I. Gregory. (Forthcoming). Discourses of Poverty in Place. Basingstoke: Palgrave.
Paterson, L.L. (Forthcoming). “You can just give those documents to myself’: Untriggered reflexive pronouns in 21st century spoken British English. In V. Brezina, R. Love & K. Aijmer. Sociolinguistic Variation in Contemporary British English: Exploration of the Spoken BNC2014. New York: Routledge.
Paterson, L.L. & L. Coffey-Glover. (Forthcoming). Tracing discourses of marriage across same-sex marriage debates in the UK press 2011-2014. Journal of Language and Sexuality.

Laurence Anthony

Professor - Waseda University

Background:
Laurence Anthony is a Professor in the Faculty of Science and Engineering at Waseda University, Japan. He is a former director of the Center for English Language Education (CELESE) and is the coordinator of the CELESE technical English program. He received his M.A. degree in TESL/TEFL, and his Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics from the University of Birmingham, UK, and his B.Sc. degree in mathematical physics from the University of Manchester, UK.

Anthony’s research interests include corpus linguistics, educational technology, natural language processing (NLP), and genre analysis. Continuing from his Masters work in genre analysis, Anthony developed software to automatically analyze texts at the sentence and discourse level for his PhD. Since then, he has been developing educational software for use by researchers, teachers, and learners in corpus linguistics, including AntConc, a freeware concordancer, AntWordProfiler, a freeware vocabulary profiler, and more recently web-based monolingual and parallel concordancers.

Notable Publications:
Anthony, L. (2013). A critical look at software tools in corpus linguistics. Linguistic Research, 2013, 30(2), 141-161.
Anthony, L. and Baker, P. (2015). ProtAnt: A tool for analysing the prototypicality of texts. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 20(3), 273-292
Anthony, L. (2016). Introducing corpora and corpus tools into the technical writing classroom through Data-Driven Learning (DDL) in J. Flowerdew and T. Costley (Eds) Discipline Specific Writing (pp. 162-180). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Anthony, L. (forthcoming). Introducing English for Specific Purposes. Abingdon: UK. Routledge Press.
Anthony, L. (forthcoming). Visualization in Corpus-Based Discourse Studies, in C. Taylor and A. Marchi (Eds.) Corpus Approaches to Discourse: A Critical Review. Abingdon: UK. Routledge Press.
Anthony, L. (2017). Reflections and future directions in publishing research in English as an Additional Language: An Afterword, in M. Cargill and S. Burgess (Eds.) Publishing Research in English as an Additional Language: Practices, Pathways and Potentials. Adelaide, Australia: University of Adelaide Press.

Michael Barlow

Associate Professor - The University of Auckland

Background:
Michael Barlow joined the University of Auckland in 2004, where he is an Associate Professor. His main research interests are related to the analysis of large text databases to increase our understanding of the cognitive representation of language (a usage-based perspective) and to make proress is understanding L2 acquiisiton and improving language teaching.

As part of that endeavour, Barlow has been creating text analysis software such as MonoConc, ParaConc, Collocate, and more recetly WordSkew. He is on the editorial boards for the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, Studies in Corpus Linguistics, Routledge Frequency Dictionary Series, and the English Language Research Journal and is associated with the Asia-Pacific Corpus Linguistics Association.

Notable Publications:
Barlow, M. (1996). Corpora for theory and practice. International journal of corpus linguistics, 1(1), 1-37.
Barlow, M. (2000). Monoconc Pro 2.0. Athelstan.
Barlow, M. (2000). Parallel texts in language teaching. Multilingual corpora in teaching and research. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 106115.
Barlow, Michael. "Corpus linguistics and theoretical linguistics." International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 16.1 (2011): 3-44.
Barlow, M. (2014). A Situated Theory of Agreement (RLE Linguistics B: Grammar). Routledge.
Barlow, M. (2016). WordSkew. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 21(1), 105-115.

Stefan Th. Gries

Professor - University of California, Santa Barbara

Background:
Stefan Th. Gries is a Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Gries earned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees at the University of Hamburg, Germany, in 1998 and 2000. He was at the Department of Business Communication and Information Science of the University of Southern Denmark at Sønderborg (1998–2005), first as a lecturer, then as assistant professor and tenured associate professor; during that time, he also taught English linguistics part-time at the Department of British and American Studies of the University of Hamburg.

In 2005, Gries spent 10 months as a visiting scholar in the Psychology Department of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, before he accepted a position at UCSB, starting November 1, 2005. Gries was a visiting professor at the 2007, 2011, 2013, and 2015 LSA Linguistic Institutes at Stanford University, the University of Colorado at Boulder, the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the University of Chicago.

Notable Publications:
Gries, Stefan Th. 2003. Multifactorial analysis in corpus linguistics: a study of Particle Placement. London & New York: Continuum Press, pp. 240.
Gries, Stefan Th. 2008. Dispersions and adjusted frequencies in corpora. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 13(4). 403-437.
Gries, Stefan Th. 2015. More (old and new) misunderstandings of collostructional analysis: on Schmid & Küchenhoff (2013). Cognitive Linguistics 26(3). 505-536.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Gries, Stefan Th. 2015. The most underused statistical method in corpus linguistics: Multi-level (and mixed-effects) models. Corpora 10(1). 95-125.
Gries, Stefan Th. 2016. Quantitative corpus linguistics with R. 2nd rev. & ext. ed. London & New York: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Group, pp. 274.

Lynne Bowker

Professor - University of Ottawa

Background:
Lynne Bowker holds a BA and MA in Translation (University of Ottawa), an MSc in Computer Applications for Education (Dublin City University), and a PhD in Language Engineering (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology). Since 1996, she has worked as a professor of translation, first at Dublin City University's School of Applied Language and Intercultural Studies and currently at the University of Ottawa's School of Translation and Interpretation.

Bowker specializes in the use of corpora for terminology, language for special purposes (LSP) , specialized lexicography, and translation. She has been a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Corpus Linguistics (John Benjamins Publishing Company) since 2004.

Notable Publications:
Bowker, Lynne (1998) "Using Specialized Monolingual Native-Language Corpora as a Translation Resource: A Pilot Study," Meta 43(4): 631-651.
Bowker, Lynne (2001) "Terminology and Gender Sensitivity: A corpus-based study of the LSP of infertility," Language in Society 30(4): 589-611.
Bowker, Lynne and Jennifer Pearson (2002) Working with Specialized Language: A Practical Guide to Using Corpora. London/New York: Routledge.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Bowker, Lynne (2010) “The Contribution of Corpus Linguistics to the Development of Specialised Dictionaries for Learners,” in Specialised Dictionaries for Learners, Pedro Fuertes Olivera (Ed). Tübingen: Max Niemeyer Verlag, 155-168.
Bowker, Lynne (2011) “Off the record and on the fly: Examining the impact of corpora on terminographic practice in the context of translation,” in Corpus-based Translation Studies: Research and Applications, Alet Kruger, Kim Wallmach and Jeremy Munday (Eds). London/NY: Continuum, 211-236.
Bowker, Lynne and Gloria Corpas Pastor (in press) “Translation Technology,” in Oxford Handbook of Computational Linguistics (2nd edition), Ruslan Mitkov (Ed). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Published online in March 2015

Tony Berber Sardinha

Associate Professor - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Background:
Tony Berber Sardinha is Associate Professor of Applied Linguistics at Sao Paulo Catholic University (PUCSP). He has published numerous books and research articles, and is on the board of several journals and book collections. His interests are corpus linguistics, metaphor analysis, and applied linguistics.

Notable Publications:
Berber Sardinha, T. (1999). Using KeyWords in text analysis: Practical aspects. Direct Papers, 42, 1-9.
Berber-Sardinha, T. (2000). Comparing corpora with WordSmith Tools: How large must the reference corpus be?. In Proceedings of the workshop on Comparing corpora-Volume 9 (pp. 7-13). Association for Computational Linguistics.
Sardinha, T. B. (2004). Lingüística de corpus. Editora Manole Ltda.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Sardinha, T. B. (2017). A Collocation-Based Analysis. Studies in Corpus-Based Sociolinguistics.
Sardinha, T. B., Delfino, M. C. N., & Rampaso, M. (2017). PREPARAÇÃO DE MATERIAL DIDÁTICO PARA ENSINO DE LÍNGUAS COM BASE EM CORPORA. The ESPecialist, 38(1).
Sardinha, T. B., & Pinto, M. V. (2017). American television and off-screen registers: a corpus-based comparison. Corpora, 12(1), 85-114.

Alan Partington

Associate Professor - University of Bologna

Background:
Alan Partington is an Associate Professor at the University of Bologna. He was born in Manchester (UK) and has degrees from the Universities of Oxford, Birmingham and Siena. He has taught at the Universities of Siena, Camerino, the School for Translators and Interpreters in Forlì, Leeds (UK), Lancaster (UK) and Bologna.

Partington’s research fields include political linguistics, corpus linguistics, that is, the study of language using computerised corpora and dedicated software, and Corpus-Assisted Discourse Studies (CADS), that is, the use of corpora to study aspects of interactive communication, generally in political discourse. He has published six books and over 70 international journal or book articles. He is currently editor-in-chief of the international Journal of Corpora and Discourse Studies (JCaDS).

Notable Publications:
Partington, A. (1998). Patterns and meanings: Using corpora for English language research and teaching (Vol. 2). John Benjamins Publishing.
Partington, A. (2006). The linguistics of laughter: A corpus-assisted study of laughter-talk. Routledge.
Partington, A., Duguid, A., & Taylor, C. (2013). Patterns and meanings in discourse: theory and practice in corpus-assisted discourse studies (CADS) (Vol. 55). John Benjamins Publishing.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Partington, A, Corpus-assisted studies of humour and laughter-talk, in: The Routledge Handbook of Language and Humor, London, Routledge, 2017, pp. 322 - 339 (ROUTLEDGE INTERNATIONAL HANDBOOKS)
Partington, Alan, Evaluative clash, evaluative cohesion and how we actually read evaluation in texts, «JOURNAL OF PRAGMATICS», 2017, 117, pp. 190 - 203
Partington, ALAN SCOTT, Varieties of non-obvious meaning in CL and CADS: from ‘hindsight post-dictability’ to sweet serendipity, «CORPORA», 2017, 12, pp. 339 - 367

Silvia bernardini

Professor - University of Bologna

Background:
Silvia Bernardini is a Full Professor at the University of Bologna and graduated in translation in Forlì (Italy) in 1997 and, after a short spell in the UK (where she got her MPhil from the University of Cambridge), came back to Forlì, where she has worked as an assistant professor, an associate professor and now as a full professor. By the time she returned to Italy, she had also completed her PhD in translation studies (Middlesex, UK). She has taught a variety of courses (technical and scientific translation, translation methods and technology, and English (corpus) linguistics) and has coordinated the Master’s course in specialised translation.

Bernardini’s research interests are in the fields of translation technology, translator education, English as a lingua franca, documentation and corpus linguistics. She has given invited talks on these topics in Belgium, Brazil, China, Germany, Norway, Serbia, Spain, Sweden, the UK and many Italian universities.

Notable Publications:
Baroni, M., & Bernardini, S. (2004, May). BootCaT: Bootstrapping Corpora and Terms from the Web. In LREC (p. 1313).
Baroni, M., Bernardini, S., Comastri, F., Piccioni, L., Volpi, A., Aston, G., & Mazzoleni, M. (2004). Introducing the La Repubblica corpus: A large, annotated, TEI (XML)-compliant corpus of newspaper Italian. issues, 2, 5-163.
Baroni, M., Bernardini, S., Ferraresi, A., & Zanchetta, E. (2009). The WaCky wide web: a collection of very large linguistically processed web-crawled corpora. Language resources and evaluation, 43(3), 209-226.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Bernardini, Silvia, Intermodal corpora: A novel resource for descriptive and applied translation studies, in: Corpus-based approaches to translation and interpreting : from theory to applications, Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang, 2016, pp. 129 - 148
Bernardini, Silvia, Discovery learning in the language-for-translation classroom: corpora as learning aids, «CADERNOS DE TRADUÇÃO», 2016, 36, pp. 14 - 35
Bernardini, Silvia; Ferraresi, Adriano; Zanchetta, Eros; Dalan, Erika, Corpora@DipInTra (Interface to the CoLiTec corpora), 2016. [Software]

Monika Bednarek

Associate Professor

Background:
Monika Bednarek is an Associate Professor at the Department of Linguistics at The University of Sydney. She gained her PhD at the University of Augsburg, Germany, in 2005 and then completed extensive post-doctoral research at the University of Sydney (2006-2008) and the University of Technology, Sydney (2008-2009).

Bednarek’s research focused, respectively, on evaluative language in the 'popular' vs. the 'quality' press, emotion talk across registers of English, and, most recently the language of fictional television and the linguistic construction of newsworthiness. Her research interests include topics in the areas of corpus linguistics, ecolinguistics, discourse analysis, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, media linguistics, and, more specifically, the linguistic expression of emotion and attitude.

Notable Publications:
• Bednarek, M. (2008) Emotion Talk across Corpora. Houndmills/New York: Palgrave Macmillan. .
• Bednarek, M. (2010). The Language of Fictional Television: Drama and Identity. London: Continuum.
Bednarek, M. (2012). 'Get us the hell out of here': Key words and trigrams in fictional television series. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 17(1), 35-63.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Bednarek, M. (2016). Investigating evaluation and news values in news items that are shared through social media. Corpora: corpus-based language learning, language processing and linguistics, 11(2), 227-257.
Bednarek, M., Caple, H. (2017). The Discourse of News Values. New York: Oxford University Press.
Bednarek, M. (2017). (Re)circulating Popular Television: Audience Engagement and Corporate Practices. In Janus Mortensen, Nikolas Coupland and Jacob Thogersen (Eds.), Style, Mediation, and Change: Sociolinguistic Perspectives on Talking Media, (pp. 115-140). New York: Oxford University Press.

Tomaz Erjavec

Senior Researcher - Jozef Stefan Institute

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Sana Nawaz

Lecturer - University of Sargodha

Background:
Sana Nawaz is a Lecturer of at the University of Sargodha, where she has been working since 2013. She completed her MPhil from Government College University Fasialabad in 2013

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
(Unpublished) Corpus driven analysis of Bapsi Sidhwa's fiction(A detail study of adjectives )
(Forthcoming) Corpus driven analysis of modal verbs in sidhwa's fiction

Denise Delegá-Lucio

Professor - Nove de Julho University

Background:
Denise Delega-Lucio is a Professor at Novo De Julho University. She completed her Phd and MA in Applied Linguistics (in Corpus Linguistics) from Pontifícia Universidade Católica de São Paulo.

Her experience in Applied Linguistics covers the following subjects: English teaching, learner language (corpus studies), motivation in the teaching learning process, course and material development, instructional design and teacher coordination and development. Speaks English, Italian, Spanish and French. Phd scholarship from CAPES.

Notable Publications:
A Variação entre textos argumentativos e o material didático de inglês: aplicações da Análise Multidimensional e do Corpus Internacional de Aprendizes de Inglês (ICLE) - Variation in argumentative texts and the English book: Multidimensional analysis and Learner corpus applied.

Sultan Almujaiwel

Associate Professor - King Saud University

Background:
Sultan Almujaiwel is an associate professor of corpus linguistics in the Arabic Department at King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. He received his PhD degree in corpus/applied linguistics from the University of Exeter, UK, in September 2013.

Notable Publications:
Al-Mujaiwel, S. N. (2016). "Free/Open KACSTAC and its Processing tools: Lexical Resources for Arabic Lexicogrammatical Microstructures Based on Collocational Indicators". In Alonso Almeida, F., Barrera, I. O. Toledo, E. Q. and Cuervo. M. E. S. (Eds.), Input a Word, Analyze the World: Selected Approaches to Corpus Linguistics. Newcastle Upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, pp. 153-170 ISBN (10) 1-4438-8513-4 (A conference paper presented in the VI International Conference on Corpus Linguistics CILC-14).
Almujaiwel, S. (2017). Grammatical construction of function words between old and modern written Arabic: A corpus-based analysis. Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory. https://doi.org/10.1515/cllt-2016-0069.
Al-Thubaity, A., and Almujaiwel S. (2017). A Quantitative Inquiry into the Keywords between Primary and Reference Arabic Corpora. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09296174.2017.1359883

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Almujaiwel, S. (Forthcoming, mid 2018). Explaining the Complexities of Cross-Linguistic Features Using Comparable Arabic and English Corpora. Corpora 13(2).
(Forthcoming) Measuring the Lexical Variation between General-Purpose Arabic Dictionaries and Natural Arabic Language.
(Forthcoming) Analysing Culture and Interculture in Saudi EFL Textbooks: A Corpus Linguistic Approach.

Rudy Loock

Professor - University of Lille

Background:
Rudy Loock is a Professor of Linguistics and Translation Studies in the Applied Languages department of the University of Lille and affiliated with the CNRS laboratory “Savoirs, Textes, Langage” (UMR 8163). His research interests include corpus‐based translation studies, in particular the use of electronic corpora as translation tools for translators and as research tools for translation studies, as well as translation teaching and translation quality.

Loock is the director of the Specialized Translation Master's programme of the University of Lille, where he teaches students how to compile and use corpora to increase the quality of their translations.

Notable Publications:
[With Bert Cappelle]. Is there interference of usage constraints?: A frequency study of existential there is and its French equivalent il y a in translated vs. non-translated texts. Target, John Benjamins Publishing, 2013, 25 (2), pp.252-275.
La Traductologie de Corpus, 2016, Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.
L’utilisation des corpus électroniques chez le traducteur professionnel : quand ? comment ? pour quoi faire ?. ILCEA 27, 2016, https://ilcea.revues.org/3835.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
[With Bert Cappelle]. Typological differences shining through: The case of phrasal verbs in translated English. Gert De Sutter; Marie-Aude Lefer; Isabelle Delaere (eds), Empirical Translation Studies. New Theoretical and Methodological Traditions, Mouton de Gruyter, pp.235-264, 2017.
[With Gert De Sutter, Bert Cappelle, Orphée De Clercq, Rudy Loock & Koen Plevoets]. Towards a corpus-based, statistical approach of translation quality : measuring and visualizing linguistic deviance in student translations, Linguistica Antverpiensia New Series - Themes in Translation Studies, 2018.

Robbie Love

Research Student - Lancaster University

Background:
Robbie Love is a Senior Research Manager in the Research and Thought Leadership Group at Cambridge Assessment English, and a PhD Research Student at the ESRC funded Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science at Lancaster University, under the supervision of Professor Tony McEnery. Love successfully defended his thesis during his viva voce, which took place in December 2017 at Lancaster University.

Notable Publications:
Love, R., & Baker, P. (2015). The hate that dare not speak its name? In M. Kopytowska (Ed.), Journal of Language, Aggression and Conflict, 3(1), Special Issue: Contemporary Discourses of Hate and Radicalism across Space and Genres, 57-86. DOI: 10.1075/jlac.3.1.03lov
Love, R., Dembry, C., Hardie, A., Brezina, V., & McEnery, T. (2017). The Spoken BNC2014: designing and building a spoken corpus of everyday conversations. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, 22(3), 319-344. DOI: 10.1075/ijcl.22.3.02lov
Love, R., Hawtin, A., & Hardie, A. (2017). The British National Corpus 2014 User Manual and Reference Guide (version 1.0). Lancaster: ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science. Available at: http://corpora.lancs.ac.uk/bnc2014/documentation.php

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Brezina, V., Love, R., & Aijmer, K. (Eds.) (forthcoming). Corpus Approaches to Contemporary British Speech: Sociolinguistic studies of the Spoken BNC2014. New York: Routledge.
McEnery, T., & Love, R. (forthcoming). Bad Language. In J. Culpeper, F. Katamba, P. Kerswill, R. Wodak, & T. McEnery (Eds.), English Language: Description, Variation and Context (2nd ed.). London: Palgrave.
Love, R. (submitted). The Spoken British National Corpus 2014: Design, compilation and analysis. Unpublished doctoral thesis. Lancaster University, UK.

Emma Franklin

Research Student - Lancaster University

Background:
Emma Franklin is an AHRC-funded PhD Candidate at Lancaster University. She completed her BA in Linguistics and English Language at the University of Wolverhampton (2010-2013), and an MRes in Corpus Linguistics at the University of Birmingham (2013-2015). During this time, she also worked for the Research Institute in Information and Language Processing, notably on the Disambiguation of Verbs by Collocation (DVC) project, under Professor Patrick Hanks, which involved the use of Corpus Pattern Analysis (CPA) to build a Pattern Dictionary of English Verbs (PDEV). At Birmingham she encountered the work of Professor Alison Sealey, who at that time was co-investigator of a project called 'People', 'Products', 'Pests' and 'Pets', which sought to elaborate on some aspects of human-animal relations by way of corpus-assisted discourse analysis, drawing on a range of British English language data representing a variety of attitudes towards animals.

Franklin combined elements of both of these projects in her PhD proposal, ‘Killing animals: a corpus approach’, and began her PhD at Lancaster University under Professor Sealey. Her thesis has a dual focus: i) the potential role of lexicography in corpus-assisted discourse analysis; and ii) varying attitudes held towards animals (and humans), as reflected in the use of ‘killing’ verbs in British English. Franklin is currently on a three-month placement at Opera North, an opera company in Leeds, where she is utilising corpus linguistics and other methods of discourse analysis to shed light on (attitudes towards) the portrayal of violence in opera.

Notable Publications:
Franklin, E. (2015). 'Some Theoretical Considerations in Off-the-Shelf Text Analysis Software'. In the Proceedings of the International Conference for Recent Advances in Natural Language Processing (RANLP) 2015, Hissar (September), pp. 8-15. Association for Computational Linguistics.
Franklin, E., & Oakes, M. (2016). Ngrams and Engrams: the Use of Structural and Conceptual Features to Discriminate Between English Translations of Religious Texts. Corpora, 11(3), pp. 299-341.
Franklin, E. (2017) 'Towards a Corpus-Lexicographical Discourse Analysis'. In the Conference Proceedings of EUROPHRAS 2017, London (November), Vol. 2, pp. 190-196. Tradulex.

Elvis C. Gomes

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Background:
Elvis C. Gomes is a PhD Candidate at Queen Mary, University of London. Before starting his PhD at Queen Mary University of London under the supervision of Erez Levon and Olivia Knapton, Elvis received a BA in Film Studies and an MA in English Language & Literature from the University of Lausanne (Switzerland). He equally holds the position of dean and taught English in a private Swiss secondary school called 'École de la Cressire' that welcomes students with learning and social difficulties.

Gomes is interested in how people use language to construct their social realities and their experiences of mental health. More specifically, he is interested in the combination of critical discourse analysis, corpus linguistics, and (virtual) ethnography to analyze computer-mediated texts related to (mental) health communication and their correlation to gender and sexuality.

Notable Publications:
Gomes, E.C., and Motschenbacher, H. (in press). Language and Normativity in Sexual Orientation Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (SO-OCD) Narratives: a Corpus-Assisted Discourse Analysis. Language in Society.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Gomes, E.C. (2016). 'Am I Gay or Is This HOCD?': A Corpus-Driven Analysis of the Discursive Practice of (Pathological) Sexual Doubt
Gomes, E.C. (2017). Exploring Normative Regulations of Sexual Intrusive Thoughts via (Virtual) Ethnographic Approaches and Corpus-Assisted Discourse Analysis. IGALA Blog (20th November). Available: http://igalaweb.wixsite.com/igala/single-post/2017/11/20/Exploring-Normative-Regulations-of-Sexual-Intrusive-Thoughts-via-Virtual-Ethnographic-Approaches-and-Corpus-Assisted-Discourse-Analysis. Date accessed: 14 November 2017.

Maria Claudia Nunes Delfino

Research Student - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Background:
Maria Claudia Nunes Delfino has taken a Masters Degree in Applied Linguistics with an emphasis in Corpus Linguistics and in 2018 she'll start her PhD in the same area

Notable Publications:
Preparing Corpus-Based Language Teaching Materials: http://dx.doi.org/10.23925/2318-7115.2017v38i1a12

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
Masters dissertation: Using Pop Songs to Teach English as a Foreign Language in a Corpus-Based Environment: https://tede2.pucsp.br/handle/handle/18896,

Humaira Jehangir

Research Student - Lancaster University

Background:
Humaira Jehangir is a PhD Candidate at Lancaster University. She has taught English language, literature and linguistics to diverse levels in various communities in Pakistan since 1996 and has experienced that creating a link between L1 and L2 helps students understand L2 better. Jehangir has a strong belief that future learning can be more effective and efficient if real language examples from a corpus are incorporated in teaching.

Jehangir has presented in conferences and attended workshops, summer school and MOOC on Corpus Linguistics. She completed her MPhil from NUML (Islamabad) and her area of research was (& is) Corpus Linguistics. Currently she is pursuing her PhD (T&C part-time) from Lancaster University, UK.

Notable Publications:
A Comparative Analysis of Deontic Modality in Pakistani and British Newspapers Editorials (Article in Kashmir Journal)

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
(Thesis will be in Corpus Linguistics, a parallel corpus contrastive study)

Adrian Yip

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Background:
Adrian Yip is a first year PhD student in the Department of Linguistics at Queen Mary University of London. His current research focuses on the representations of female and male tennis players in the new media, including online news websites, social media such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Yip is also interested in the intersections of gender and other identities, and more broadly, the interplay between language and power relations in various contexts (esp. sport and professional communication). For methodological frameworks, he is most passionate about mixed-methods approaches, particularly corpus-assisted (critical) discourse analysis.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
The title of Yip’s working thesis is "Connect the dots in the new media: Corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis of gender representations in professional tennis".

Frazer Heritage

Research Student - Lancaster University

Background:
Frazer Heritage is a PhD Candidate at Lancaster University. He completed his BA and Masters by Research at the University of Birmingham. Heritage is interested in the representation of gender and sexuality in video games using corpus linguistics.

Recent/Forthcoming Publications:
(Forthcoming) The Representation of gender in a Digital Age: A Corpus Study of the Witcher Video Games

I am Ahdi Hassan

CEO - PL Corpora

I am Zubair Torwali

Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi (IBT)

I am Syed Maria Rasool Shah

PL Corpora

I am Rehmat Aziz Khan Chitrali

Independent Scholar

RESEARCHER PROFILES

On this page you will find a brief research profile of some researchers who have utilised Corpus Linguistics in one or more of their research studies. This section is broken down into FOUR CATEGORIES: UK Based Academics; International Academics; Research Students; Independent Scholars.

AAC - FOUNDER

S. Bilal Kadiri

S. Bilal Kadiri

Assistant Professor - King Khalid University

S. Bilal Kadiri

Assistant Professor - King Khalid University

UK BASED ACADEMICS

Paul Baker

Paul Baker

Professor - Lancaster University

Paul Baker

Professor - Lancaster University

Costas Gabrielatos

Costas Gabrielatos

Senior Lecturer - Edge Hill University

Costas Gabrielatos

Senior Lecturer - Edge Hill University

Tony McEnery

Tony McEnery

Distinguished Professor - Lancaster University

Tony McEnery

Distinguished Professor - Lancaster University

Paul Rayson

Paul Rayson

Reader - Lancaster University

Paul Rayson

Reader - Lancaster University

Jonathan Culpeper

Jonathan Culpeper

Professor - Lancaster University

Jonathan Culpeper

Professor - Lancaster University

Paul Thompson

Paul Thompson

Senior Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Paul Thompson

Senior Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Amanda Potts

Amanda Potts

Lecturer - Cardiff University

Amanda Potts

Lecturer - Cardiff University

Bodo Winter

Bodo Winter

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Bodo Winter

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Eric Atwell

Eric Atwell

Associate Professor - Leeds University

Eric Atwell

Associate Professor - Leeds University

Ronald Carter

Ronald Carter

Emeritus Professor - The University of Nottingham

Ronald Carter

Emeritus Professor - The University of Nottingham

Matteo Fuoli

Matteo Fuoli

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

Matteo Fuoli

Lecturer - University of Birmingham

John Flowerdew

John Flowerdew

(Professor) Visiting Chair - Lancaster University

John Flowerdew

(Professor) Visiting Chair - Lancaster University

Bas Aarts

Bas Aarts

Professor - University College London

Bas Aarts

Professor - University College London

Jens Zinn

Jens Zinn

Researcher - Lancaster University

Jens Zinn

Researcher - Lancaster University

Rachelle Vessey

Rachelle Vessey

Lecturer - Birkbeck University of London

Rachelle Vessey

Lecturer - Birkbeck University of London

Glenn Hadikin

Glenn Hadikin

Senior Lecturer - University of Portsmouth

Glenn Hadikin

Senior Lecturer - University of Portsmouth

Doug Arnold

Doug Arnold

Visiting Fellow - University of Essex

Doug Arnold

Visiting Fellow - University of Essex

Ian Gregory

Ian Gregory

Professor - Lancaster University

Ian Gregory

Professor - Lancaster University

Helen Baker

Helen Baker

Researcher

Helen Baker

Researcher

Mahmoud El-Haj

Mahmoud El-Haj

Researcher - Lancaster University

Mahmoud El-Haj

Researcher - Lancaster University

Mark McGlashan

Mark McGlashan

Lecturer - Birmingham CIty University

Mark McGlashan

Lecturer - Birmingham CIty University

Laura Paterson

Laura Paterson

Lecturer - The Open University

Laura Paterson

Lecturer - The Open University

INTERNATIONAL ACADEMICS

Laurence Anthony

Laurence Anthony

Professor - Waseda University

Laurence Anthony

Professor - Waseda University

Michael Barlow

Michael Barlow

Associate Professor - The University of Auckland

Michael Barlow

Associate Professor - The University of Auckland

Stefan Th. Gries

Stefan Th. Gries

Professor - University of California, Santa Barbara

Stefan Th. Gries

Professor - University of California, Santa Barbara

Lynne Bowker

Lynne Bowker

Professor - University of Ottawa

Lynne Bowker

Professor - University of Ottawa

Tony Berber Sardinha

Tony Berber Sardinha

Associate Professor - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Tony Berber Sardinha

Associate Professor - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Alan Partington

Alan Partington

Associate Professor - University of Bologna

Alan Partington

Associate Professor - University of Bologna

Silvia bernardini

Silvia bernardini

Professor - University of Bologna

Silvia bernardini

Professor - University of Bologna

Monika Bednarek

Monika Bednarek

Associate Professor

Monika Bednarek

Associate Professor

Tomaz Erjavec

Tomaz Erjavec

Senior Researcher - Jozef Stefan Institute

Tomaz Erjavec

Senior Researcher - Jozef Stefan Institute

Sana Nawaz

Sana Nawaz

Lecturer - University of Sargodha

Sana Nawaz

Lecturer - University of Sargodha

Denise Delegá-Lucio

Denise Delegá-Lucio

Professor - Nove de Julho University

Denise Delegá-Lucio

Professor - Nove de Julho University

Sultan Almujaiwel

Sultan Almujaiwel

Associate Professor - King Saud University

Sultan Almujaiwel

Associate Professor - King Saud University

Rudy Loock

Rudy Loock

Professor - University of Lille

Rudy Loock

Professor - University of Lille

RESEARCH STUDENTS

Robbie Love

Robbie Love

Research Student - Lancaster University

Robbie Love

Research Student - Lancaster University

Emma Franklin

Emma Franklin

Research Student - Lancaster University

Emma Franklin

Research Student - Lancaster University

Elvis C. Gomes

Elvis C. Gomes

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Elvis C. Gomes

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Maria Claudia Nunes Delfino

Maria Claudia Nunes Delfino

Research Student - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Maria Claudia Nunes Delfino

Research Student - PUC-SP (Brazil)

Humaira Jehangir

Humaira Jehangir

Research Student - Lancaster University

Humaira Jehangir

Research Student - Lancaster University

Adrian Yip

Adrian Yip

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Adrian Yip

Research Student - Queen Mary, University of London

Frazer Heritage

Frazer Heritage

Research Student - Lancaster University

Frazer Heritage

Research Student - Lancaster University

INDEPENDENT SCHOLARS

Ahdi Hassan

Ahdi Hassan

CEO - PL Corpora

Ahdi Hassan

CEO - PL Corpora

Zubair Torwali

Zubair Torwali

Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi (IBT)

Zubair Torwali

Idara Baraye Taleem-o-Taraqi (IBT)

Syed Maria Rasool Shah

PL Corpora

Rehmat Aziz Khan Chitrali

Rehmat Aziz Khan Chitrali

Independent Scholar

Rehmat Aziz Khan Chitrali

Independent Scholar

DISCLAIMER: All the above images are the property of their respective copyright holders and have been used by All About Corpora for information purposes only. In instances where organisational logos were not able to be used due to their incompatibility with the website software, a text based alternative was used to indicate the organisation’s name.

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